Peter ten Haaf

The use of (real-time) data to adjust production processes - in machining the term is 'adaptive machining' - is the future of production. This is made possible by the increased availability of sensors. However, everything depends on having and understanding a standardised and structured model, in which the digital information is processed into a physical action. Such models are the key to successful digitalisation. In a series of blog posts, we highlight some basic models. In this second part, we will discuss a model for the calculation of the specific cutting force.

Herman Derache
Jeroen Deleu

If 2020 was characterised, for many companies, by anguish and the disruption of their usual business activities due to a pandemic that hit hard, 2021 can absolutely be characterised by the unprecedented resilience of those same companies.

Denis Vandormael

The Internet of Things is conquering the world, already well established in some domains and starting a revolution in others, such as the medical and patient care sector. The new upcoming applications may require other integration techniques to be considered. Enter '3D-PID', developed by Sirris, offering a great flexibility and capacity for customisation, as the approach is essentially based on 3D printing techniques. Discover the four steps of this approach and its advantages here!

Marc Bollen
Christophe Michiels

Fitting custom interior doors on large construction sites is far from easy. To get the job done as correctly and efficiently as possible, Kulapro examined the options for an augmented reality-based indoor navigation system for its installers.

Pascal Pollet

Innovative technologies making companies stronger and more competitive for the future also have a lot to offer to the machining industry. The Interreg project 'Machining 4.0' translates the broad Industry 4.0 vision into concrete applications for machining, tailored to SMEs. Within this context we established ten practical guidelines.

Peter ten Haaf

Controlling and adjusting production machining through the use of data - including real-time data - is called 'adaptive processing'. It’s the future of production and is made possible by the increased availability of sensors. However, everything depends on having and understanding a standardised and structured model in which the digital information is processed into a physical action. These models are the key to successful digitisation. In a new series of blog posts, we highlight some basic models. In this first part, we will discuss the tool life curve, which is a model for finding the optimum cutting speed.

Samuel Milton

On the online platform ‘Model-based machining’ you can find calculation models that use information from tool life curves for finding the most economical cutting speed. This lets you select the most cost-effective machining process. We are organising training courses to help with the practical implementation of the calculation models.

Peter ten Haaf

When striving for an Industry 4.0 production system, the first requirement is to connect the production machines within a network. In a machining production environment with a wide variety of machines - modern, obsolete, designed for batch processes, manual, etc. - this presents a major challenge.

Walter Auwers

Stas Waregem, Terumo, P&V Panels, ZF Windpower, Vinventions and Takeda Belgium may as of today bear the title of Factory of the Future. With this award, the initiators want to crown the most future-oriented manufacturing companies in Belgium. The 48 Belgian title holders have achieved more growth in productivity, turnover and jobs between 2015 and 2020 than the rest of the manufacturing industry.

Jakob Kesteloot

Thyssenkrupp Materials wanted to boost the overall equipment efficiency of its metal sawing by increasing the productivity and availability of a hacksaw machine and cutting the cost of replacing its blades. This turned out to be extremely cheap and simple to implement.