Friction between moving parts plays an important role in many applications. The lower the friction, the less energy is needed to move parts and the less wear and tear will occur. Research at Sirris has shown that applying small holes in sliding surfaces has a positive effect on friction behaviour.

How effective you can machine a part largely depends on the structural dynamics of all the components involved in the process. It can be seen as two systems: one concerning the machine tool, which includes the drives in the spindle, the tool holder and the cutting tool, while the other system concerns the workpiece being cut and the fixture set-up. Now to have an effective cutting process, the dynamics of both the systems should be taken into account.

Do you lack time to explore all the available routes in the field of additive manufacturing? Sirris’ experts have created a practical tool to help you make the right choice of processes, machines, materials, suppliers, etc.

Additive manufacturing - (AM) - or 3D printing technologies have soared in recent years. Thanks to this evolution, we can now design and produce parts with (superior) properties that cannot be made with classical production methods. If, as a result, the designer makes maximum use of his design freedom, a higher production cost may be more than justified: in the end, what counts is the total cost of ownership.

The H2020 project AMable calls again for proposals that bring forward an innovative idea of functional products that needs additive manufacturing (AM) to become real.

Who has not heard of the fantastic benefits that additive manufacturing (AM) technologies have brought to real world applications? We are now seeing parts designed that are lighter, more efficient and that are fancy. Several new technologies in AM have popped up and old ones are getting highly efficient and automated to process materials and generate little waste. There are however, still a few challenges.

Ceramics are usually the best choice for extreme conditions over a long time span and offer several advantages compared to metals. The main applications of technical ceramics are linked to one or more of these advantages. However, the high hardness of ceramics is also responsible for their main drawbacks. This is why additive manufacturing with ceramics can be challenging. Sirris drew up an e-book on the subject, which you can download for free now.

The rise of additive manufacturing requires digital support for the entire production chain in order to be able to monitor and guarantee product quality. In order to make this possible, Sirris is working on an eID or digital passport for products in its 4.0 Made Real Pilot Factory.

Parts produced by additive manufacturing can be found in an increasing number of sectors where quality criteria are extremely strict, such as the aeronautical field and medicine. For the manufacturers producing these parts, command is essential, not only of their production tool parameters, but also of the quality of the raw materials they comprise. Sirris helps those manufacturers to implement robust quality assurance and control systems.

To produce parts in additive manufacturing (AM) out of metal powders is not a push-and-play technology. Due to the specific thermal history of parts, there are numerous causes of part distortions, even a production crash in the worst cases. Software solutions come in handy here...