Some references

Who is better placed to explain what Sirris can do for you than our member companies themselves? Here are a few examples from various domains, to show what you can expect from us.

Liège-based OEM Safran Aero Boosters wanted to assess whether it could produce its turbojet engine blades using additive manufacturing. At present, these metal parts – vital for aircraft propulsion – are made by conventional machining, with high levels of material waste. In 2014 and 2015, Sirris helped Safran Aero Boosters to assess the technology, by producing a series of parts at its own additive manufacturing facilities, and to select the most suitable equipment for the company’s needs.
Sirris is taking part in Sonaca's Fasama project, which is co-financed by the Walloon Region as part of the Marshall Plan 4.0. The aim is to assess whether additive manufacturing technologies can produce metal parts suitable for the aviation industry, with optimal mass and functionality. In late 2015, the partners selected the appropriate technology and produced a number of test parts, primarily for aircraft wing anti-icing systems.
In early 2015, when the Dutch SME Sit & Heat contacted Sirris to produce a heated stadium seat, it knocked on the right door. A few years earlier, Sirris had already developed applications for slightly conductive thermoplastic materials. Unlike conventional, fully insulating plastics, an electric current can flow though this type of material. The current meets with resistance, which releases heat. It is the ideal solution for Sit & Heat.
In late 2015, Coris BioConcept launched a new, fully-automated medical diagnostic platform – a sort of portable laboratory no bigger than an office computer. The sample taken from the patient is entered into the device on various fluidic chips depending on the types of analysis to be conducted. Coris called on Sirris's expertise in microfabrication to develop the biomedical analysis chip, which has microchannels measuring a fraction of a millimetre.
Tuning acoustic drums is a time-consuming business. A digital drumhead, with printed sensors that record the vibrations, could provide a solution. But such sensors are also useful when the drums are being played: they monitor the drumhead vibrations and the force and position of each strike, enabling drumming to be digitalised. To investigate the feasibility of a solution involving printed sensors for its smart drumhead, developer Smarthead Innovations sought assistance from Sirris.
Increasingly stringent legislation is forcing chemical manufacturers to adopt new production methods. For Prince, or more specifically its enamel production site in Bruges, this meant developing a new environmentally friendly enamel powder. Sirris spent two years carrying out intensive scientific research to this end, resulting in a positive outcome in 2015.
While open source technologies and rapid development platforms are lowering the barriers for SMEs, these players are not always aware of their systems’ improvement potential or how to implement improvements cost-effectively. With the VIS project ‘Mechatronics for innovation followers’, Sirris is showing them the way.
Haelvoet, which manufactures beds for the health and care sector, was looking for ways to make patient care more efficient while also enhancing comfort and safety. Sirris developed a prototype for a smart bed, involving sensors, a central processing unit and a software application. This will allow healthcare professionals to better monitor their patients and automate their workflow.
Herlou Group, based in Limburg, is an international construction trading and consultancy firm. On the advice of the Limburg Innovation Centre, manager and senior consultant Herwig Louwet contacted Sirris in 2015 with sketch plans for a new tool designed to facilitate and enhance the lifting and moving of PVC window profiles. In the ensuing months, Sirris examined and refined the plans and thoroughly tested their viability.......
In 2015, iBeauty, which runs an online CRM platform for beauty salons and hairdressers, became the 40th company to take part in the Sirris Startathlon. At Startathlon workshops, between five and seven SaaS and hardware companies, both start-ups and spin-offs, get the opportunity to work on their own innovative business case with a team of Sirris experts. iBeauty was therefore guided through seven clear steps towards a validated growth model.

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